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Rails 4.2: how to exclude performance tests during normal test runs


Rails 4.2: how to exclude performance tests during normal test runs

By : Paul Mannion
Date : November 22 2020, 01:01 AM
wish helps you you could either redefine the test task or create a new one with only the test suites you want.
have a look at the PR changing it https://github.com/rails/rails/pull/17348
code :


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Visual Studio 2010 Web Performance Test / Load tests / Coded UI Tests. ANYONE REALLY USE THESE?

Visual Studio 2010 Web Performance Test / Load tests / Coded UI Tests. ANYONE REALLY USE THESE?


By : Ludwig Eisenblätter
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
fixed the issue. Will look into that further I tried both Selenium and Coded UI for integration testing the project I am working on. I wrote a blog article with my impressions.
The bottom line for me is that both Selenium and Coded UI are still far from perfect, but better than manual testing. I am using Selenium right now, though I might revisit CodedUI if a few things would be fixed in a later version.
Rails 'rake test' runs test twice immediately after creating new rails project

Rails 'rake test' runs test twice immediately after creating new rails project


By : cynthiazazza
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
this will help I realize this post is pretty old, but in case you never figured it out, or someone else is confused by this (like I was tonight), here's what's going on:
There are actually 2 sets of tests running here: functional tests & unit tests. When you generate a controller in a fresh Rails project like that, you get some functional tests, and you get a stubbed out unit test file with no actual tests in it.
code :
0 tests, 0 assertions, 0 failures, 0 errors, 0 skips
Rails 5.1 run system tests and normal tests with one command

Rails 5.1 run system tests and normal tests with one command


By : Aneesh Shekar G
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
I wish did fix the issue. bin/rails test:system test
Specifying test:system before test will run both system and ordinary tests. The opposite order will only run the ordinary tests however.
How to exclude another logic and improve performance of unit tests

How to exclude another logic and improve performance of unit tests


By : tdeekens
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
it should still fix some issue I'm trying to improve performance of unit tests in my project. If I write test in one logic I need to write another logic in my test. I reproduce it like this: I have class ProductInfo ,
How to exclude another logic
code :
public class ProductBuilder
{
    private string _productName;
    private decimal _price;
    private int _quantity;

    public ProductBuilder ProductName(string name)
    {
        _productName = name;
        return this;
    }

    public ProductBuilder Price(decimal price)
    {
        _price = price;
        return this;
    }

    public ProductBuilder Quantity(int quantity)
    {
        _quantity = quantity;
        return this;
    }

    public Product Create()
    {
        return new Product
        {
            Info = new ProductInfo { Name = _productName },
            Price = _price,
            Quantity = _price, 
        }
    }
}
[TestMethod]
public void InfoTitel_ReturnsProductNameAndPrice()
{
    var builder = new ProductBuilder();

    var product = builder.ProductName("Device X").Price(100).Create();

    product.Info.Title.Should().Be("Device X-100.00 USD");
}

[TestMethod]
public void TotalPrice_CalculatesFromPriceAndQuantity()
{
    var builder = new ProductBuilder();

    var product = builder.Price(35.99m).Quantity(2).Create();

    product.TotalPrice.Should().Be(71.98m);
}
During Maven Build Junit Tests runs fine, but why they fails, if I runs JUnit test manually?

During Maven Build Junit Tests runs fine, but why they fails, if I runs JUnit test manually?


By : Jonathan Kowarski
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
will help you Most-likely, this test of yours depends on the execution of another one which produces some files, other resources or store data somewhere (for example in a database or something). TDD (test-driver development) states that any tests you write should be their own independent entities, meaning: any test you write should be completely self-sufficient and not depend on things produced by other tests executed before it.
Simply put: make sure your test has all the proper resources/data produced in it's setUp() method or that the required test resources are copied by Maven before your test executes.
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