logo
down
shadow

Is user class responsible for authentication?


Is user class responsible for authentication?

By : Marcelo Amaral
Date : November 21 2020, 07:31 AM
help you fix your problem Ideally no, that should be the job of the controller. User class should be just a data class, which is used by the controller (the business logic class) to evaluate things like Authenticate etc.
Explanation:
code :


Share : facebook icon twitter icon
How can I make one class solely responsible for creating and providing access to another class

How can I make one class solely responsible for creating and providing access to another class


By : James Khatiblou
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
will help you You don't really need more than one singleton for that. Look at this example:
code :
using System;

// interface for the "inner singleton"
interface IPuppet {
    void DoSomething();
}

class MasterOfPuppets {

    // private class: only MasterOfPuppets can create
    private class PuppetImpl : IPuppet {
        public void DoSomething() {
        }
    }

    static MasterOfPuppets _instance = new MasterOfPuppets();

    public static MasterOfPuppets Instance {
        get { return _instance; }
    }

    // private set accessor: only MasterOfPuppets can replace instance
    public IPuppet Puppet {
        get;
        private set;
    }
}

class Program {
    public static void Main(params string[] args) {
        // access singleton and then inner instance
        MasterOfPuppets.Instance.Puppet.DoSomething();
    }
}
In a Web Client - RESTapi - RDB system, what should be responsible for user authentication?

In a Web Client - RESTapi - RDB system, what should be responsible for user authentication?


By : Brady Avery
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
To fix this issue So, it looks like the answer is to use middleware, and yes the database trusts what it's given.
I've decided on passport.js
Why does the cpu responsible for setting the dirty and accessed bits but the OS is responsible for clearing them?

Why does the cpu responsible for setting the dirty and accessed bits but the OS is responsible for clearing them?


By : user6517183
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
Hope that helps An access bit couldn't be set by the kernel unless it intercepted all memory accesses. That would kind of ruin performance. Same with the dirty bit, it's way easier and simpler and cheaper for the CPU to set it since it's in fact doing the write.
Clearing the dirty bit can't be done by the CPU, because it's part of the paging and swapping, which can only be handled by the OS.
Unable to use token authentication as the only authentication class in django-rest-knox with custom user model

Unable to use token authentication as the only authentication class in django-rest-knox with custom user model


By : EvilEd
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
I wish this helpful for you First issue was in AuthTokenSerializer in views.py. AuthTokenSerializer uses username and password for login, whereas my custom user model was using email and password. Second issue was in LoginInterestedUserSerializer in which I had used ModelSerializer and thus subsqeuently inherited create method due to which I got the error user with this email already exists. Therefore, serializers.Serializer should be used. Following are working code snippets:-
serializers.py
code :
class UserSerializer(serializers.ModelSerializer):
    class Meta:
        model = InterestedUser
        fields = ('full_name', 'email')


class LoginInterestedUserSerializer(serializers.Serializer):

    email = serializers.EmailField()
    password = serializers.CharField(max_length=128)

    def validate(self, data):
        user = authenticate(**data)
        if user and user.is_active:
            return user
        raise serializers.ValidationError("Unable to log in with the provided credentials")
class LoginView(GenericAPIView):
    serializer_class = LoginInterestedUserSerializer

    def post(self, request, *args, **kwargs):
        serializer = self.serializer_class(data=request.data, context={'request': request})
        serializer.is_valid(raise_exception=True)
        user = serializer.validated_data
        return Response({
            "user": UserSerializer(user, context=self.get_serializer_context()).data, 
            "token": AuthToken.objects.create(user)[1]
        })
How do I decide the attributes and operations that a class will be responsible for in a design class diagram?

How do I decide the attributes and operations that a class will be responsible for in a design class diagram?


By : Никита Токарев
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
will help you Designing a class diagram is usually something that is open to the interpretation of the person making it. Not sure about other methods of going about this, but this is how I usually approach this problem:
Identify the types of objects (i.e. classes) that exist within the scenario. These are individual items that exist within your scenario (e.g. User, ExpenseClaim, ExpenseItem). A good practice for identifying these are items that usually have pieces of data (i.e. properties) or perform a function (i.e. methods). In general, you may want to err on the side of identifying as many things as possible as the idea is that each class is supposed to do a specific thing and no more than that (you will probably revise this when carrying out the later steps). However, don't confuse objects with actors - the system is actually what the whole class diagram explains so it should never be considered as a class. For each type of object, look at the data they contain and translate them into either properties or relations onto other types of object. Really try and limit the amount of data that each object has; if one object has a lot of properties, it is probably ripe for splitting it up into multiple objects. Taking the example of ExpenseClaim and ExpenseItem, its clear that each ExpenseClaim has a list of ExpenseItem, so you might want to link these with a composition arrow. Now lastly look at each one and think about the things that other objects might try and do to change the data that the object has - this will probably be your methods. For an ExpenseClaim object it will probably have a confirm() method for changing the state of an isConfirmed::boolean property. Again, really try and limit the amount of functionality to the specific role that the object plays - if an object has too many functions or a function that doesn't really suit it, it probably means that there is another (new) object that will suit it better.
shadow
Privacy Policy - Terms - Contact Us © ourworld-yourmove.org