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Reference type confusing in Go language


Reference type confusing in Go language

By : Alimohamad Akbari To
Date : November 18 2020, 11:13 AM
Hope this helps The problem is in method containsIndex. Golang range by default creates copy each element in slice and assigns copy of this value to st (in your example). Usually to preserve reference to element in slice you should use original slice and its index. In you case method containsIndex should look something like this:
code :
func (trie *Trie) containsIndex(next string) *Trie {
    if next != "" {
        for i, st := range trie.subtrie {
            if st.index == next[0] {
                return &trie.subtrie[i]
            }
        }
    }
    return nil
}


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Delphi 2010: Confusing generic type TList scenario? Pass by value or reference?

Delphi 2010: Confusing generic type TList scenario? Pass by value or reference?


By : user3089793
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
it fixes the issue Added some comments to your procedure to point out exactly where the "bug" is.
code :
procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  Shape: TShape;
  FirstPoint: TMyPoint;
  SecondPoint: TMyPoint;
  Temp: TMyPoint;
begin
  // Create the corners list
  Shape.Corners := TList<TMyPoint>.Create; // We create a new TList<TMyPOint> OBJECT. Shape.Corners is a reference
  // Add the first point to corners
  FirstPoint.x := 10;
  FirstPoint.y := 20;
  Shape.Corners.Add(FirstPoint); // Add FirstPoint to the list we created at step 1.
  // Add the shape to the Shape_List
  Shape_List.Add(Shape); // Add a copy of the Shape record to the Shape_List

  // Clear the shape corners
  Shape.Corners.Clear; // Clear the Shape.Corners reference. This effectively clears the list of corners
                       // in the Shape you just added to Shape_List because it contains the same
                       // reference.

  // Add another point to corners
  SecondPoint.x := 100;
  SecondPoint.y := 200;
  Shape.Corners.Add(SecondPoint); // Add a new point to the Corners list. Remamber, Corners is actually
                                  // a reference. The first Shape you added to Shape_List contains a copy
                                  // of this exact same reference, so you're effectively adding a first point
                                  // to both Shape.Corners and Shape_List[0].Corners.

  // Show the x of the first point of the first shape
  Label1.Caption := IntToStr(Shape_List[0].Corners[0].x); // Yup, you just added that point, so you get 100
end;
How to avoid confusing when using scripting language?

How to avoid confusing when using scripting language?


By : user3217074
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
it fixes the issue There's a few ways to deal with this...
Use an IDE that supports docblocks. This deals with the pre-runtime type checking when writing code. Use type checking within your function This only helps with the runtime type checking, and you won't know when writing your code. Depending on the type you can use built-in type hinting. This however only works for non-scalar values, specifically array and a class name.
code :
/**
 * Say hello to someone.
 *
 * @param string $aName
 **/
public function sayHello($aName) {
public function sayHello($aName) {
    if (!is_string($aName)) {
        throw new ArgumentException("Type not correct.");
    }
    // Normal execution
public function manipulateArray(array $anArray) {
Programming can be confusing. Ruby language

Programming can be confusing. Ruby language


By : Ben Sturley
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
wish of those help You're going to have to work backwards here. Formatting a string is easily done with the sprintf method, but how do you know what to put in that? Here's the target:
code :
sprintf("%d:%02d", hours, minutes)
hours = minutes / 60
minutes = minutes % 60
C language problem with this confusing typedef

C language problem with this confusing typedef


By : user2133792
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
seems to work fine The typedef defines a function type. It is not terribly useful in itself, but it allows us to declare a function pointer to that type, just as we declare a normal object pointer. And that's what string * stringptr; does - declaring a function pointer to a function of the form void string(char * str,int num);
Confusing language in specification of strtol, et al

Confusing language in specification of strtol, et al


By : Sujitha Bolla
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
This might help you The specification for strtol conceptually divides the input string into "initial whitespace", a "subject sequence", and a "final string", and defines the "subject sequence" as: , I think the C99 language is quite clear:
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