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Force fields to share lifetimes


Force fields to share lifetimes

By : Anderson Monteiro
Date : November 17 2020, 04:28 AM
I hope this helps you . I think your issue can be solved by adding one more layer. You can have one layer that collects the rules of your lexer, and then you create a new struct that actually does the lexing. This is parallel to how the iterators in Rust are implemented themselves!
code :
struct MetaLexer<'a> {
    rules: Vec<(&'a str, u32)>,
}

impl<'a> MetaLexer<'a> {
    fn new() -> MetaLexer<'a> { MetaLexer { rules: Vec::new() } }

    fn add_rule(&mut self, name: &'a str, val: u32) {
        self.rules.push((name, val));
    }

    fn lex<'r, 's>(&'r self, s: &'s str) -> Lexer<'a, 's, 'r> {
        Lexer {
            rules: &self.rules,
            work: s,
        }
    }
}

struct Lexer<'a : 'r, 's, 'r> {
    rules: &'r [(&'a str, u32)],
    work: &'s str,
}

impl<'a, 's, 'r> Iterator for Lexer<'a, 's, 'r> {
    type Item = u32;

    fn next(&mut self) -> Option<u32> {
        for &(name, val) in self.rules.iter() {
            if self.work.starts_with(name) {
                self.work = &self.work[name.len()..];
                return Some(val);
            }
        }

        None
    }
}

fn main() {
    let mut ml = MetaLexer::new();
    ml.add_rule("hello", 10);
    ml.add_rule("world", 3);

    for input in ["hello", "world", "helloworld"].iter() {
        // So that we have an allocated string,
        // like io::stdin().lock().lines() might give us
        let input = input.to_string(); 

        println!("Input: '{}'", input);
        for token in ml.lex(&input) {
            println!("Token was: {}", token);
        }
    }
}


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How to force Share Intent to open a specific app?

How to force Share Intent to open a specific app?


By : user3826663
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
will help you I like share intent, it is perfect to open sharing apps with image and text parameters. , For Facebook
code :
public void shareFacebook() {
        String fullUrl = "https://m.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=..";
        try {
            Intent sharingIntent = new Intent(Intent.ACTION_SEND);
            sharingIntent.setClassName("com.facebook.katana",
                    "com.facebook.katana.ShareLinkActivity");
            sharingIntent.putExtra(Intent.EXTRA_TEXT, "your title text");
            startActivity(sharingIntent);

        } catch (Exception e) {
            Intent i = new Intent(Intent.ACTION_VIEW);
            i.setData(Uri.parse(fullUrl));
            startActivity(i);

        }
    }
public void shareTwitter() {
        String message = "Your message to post";
        try {
            Intent sharingIntent = new Intent(Intent.ACTION_SEND);
            sharingIntent.setClassName("com.twitter.android","com.twitter.android.PostActivity");
            sharingIntent.putExtra(Intent.EXTRA_TEXT, message);
            startActivity(sharingIntent);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            Log.e("In Exception", "Comes here");
            Intent i = new Intent();
            i.putExtra(Intent.EXTRA_TEXT, message);
            i.setAction(Intent.ACTION_VIEW);
            i.setData(Uri.parse("https://mobile.twitter.com/compose/tweet"));
            startActivity(i);
        }
    }
Bizarre object lifetimes in ARC: how to force precise object lifetimes?

Bizarre object lifetimes in ARC: how to force precise object lifetimes?


By : Anthony Levillon
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
I hope this helps you . MyObject wouldn't be released at the end of someOperation because the object that createMyObject returns is retained (when created) and autoreleased (when returned).
So while someOperation subsequently assigns that object to x and retains and releases it as you'd expect, there's still that autoreleased reference from createMyObject that won't be cleared until the autorelease pool is drained (which normally happens at the end of every run loop).
code :
-(void)someOperation{
  NSLog(@"  Entering someOperation");
  MyObject* x = [[MyObject alloc] init];
  NSLog(@"  Exiting someOperation; x should be deallocated right after this...");
}
JSON.Net: Force serialization of all private fields and all fields in sub-classes

JSON.Net: Force serialization of all private fields and all fields in sub-classes


By : Nicoline Rasmussen
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
it fixes the issue I have a class with several different classes and I send the information in these classes out to clients but I don't want to send them all out so some are private, some have the [JsonObject(MemberSerialization.OptIn)] flag etc. , This should work:
code :
var settings = new JsonSerializerSettings() { ContractResolver = new MyContractResolver() };
var json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(obj, settings);
public class MyContractResolver : Newtonsoft.Json.Serialization.DefaultContractResolver
{
    protected override IList<JsonProperty> CreateProperties(Type type, MemberSerialization memberSerialization)
    {
        var props = type.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance)
                        .Select(p => base.CreateProperty(p, memberSerialization))
                    .Union(type.GetFields(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance)
                               .Select(f => base.CreateProperty(f, memberSerialization)))
                    .ToList();
        props.ForEach(p => { p.Writable = true; p.Readable = true; });
        return props;
    }
}
force different npm modules to share same dependency

force different npm modules to share same dependency


By : Erwan
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
To fix the issue you can do This is supported in NPM 3 and higher.
One copy of library A will be installed and will be used by both library B and web-client, as long as library A version constraints match in library B and web-client dependencies.
code :
npm dedupe
npm i
Passing on lifetimes of underlying reference fields?

Passing on lifetimes of underlying reference fields?


By : Jacob Berry
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
wish of those help The point the compiler is trying to get across is that &'db self actually means self: &'db Write<'db>. This means that you tie the reference AND the type to the same lifetime. What you actually want in your case is self: &'a Write<'db> where 'a lives just for the as_read function. To be able to return a 'db reference from a 'a reference, you need to specify that 'a lives at least as long as 'db by constraining 'a: 'db.
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